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Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors

Researchers from Bochum, Göttingen, Duisburg and Cologne have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections. They use fluorescent nanosensors to track down pathogens faster and more easily than with established methods. Traditional methods of detecting bacteria require tissue samples to be taken and analysed. The team hope to eliminate the need to take samples by using tiny optical sensors to visualise pathogens directly at the site of infection. more…


The smell of cooperation

Despite their reputation, rats are surprisingly sociable and actually regularly help each other out with tasks. Researchers at the Universities of Göttingen, Bern and St Andrews have now shown that a rat just has to smell the scent of another rat that is engaged in helpful behaviour to increase his or her own helpfulness. This is the first study to show that just the smell of a cooperating individual rat is enough to trigger an altruistic and helpful response in another. more…


Research with global impact

The University of Göttingen features in this year's list of "Highly Cited Researchers" once again, with the inclusion of five of its scientists. Chemist Professor Lutz Ackermann, agroecologist Professor Teja Tscharntke, agricultural scientist Professor Tobias Plieninger, biochemist Professor Ivo Feußner and biodiversity researcher Professor Holger Kreft are among the most frequently cited scientists in their fields worldwide. more…


Surprises in ‘active’ aging

Aging is a process that affects not only living beings. Many materials, like plastics and glasses, also age and there are computer models to describe this. Biological materials, such as living tissue, can show similar behaviour to glasses except that the particles are actual cells which may have their own propulsion. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have now used computer simulations to explore the aging behaviour of these systems. There was a surprise: the activity of the particles can actually drive aging. more…


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Further news

Tackling Brightness Variations of Stubborn Stars

The International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Solar System Science at the University of Göttingen has reached a milestone: With Eliana Amazo Gómez, the 200th doctoral student of the IMPRS has now defended her doctoral thesis and thus successfully completed her PhD. In her thesis, the 33-year-old Colombian scientist developed a new method of deducing the rotational period of stars from their brightness fluctuations. more…

Apply now: Dorothea Schlözer Programmes

Applications are invited for the Dorothea Schlözer Mentoring and Dorothea Schlözer Career Coaching 2021: the mentoring programme is aimed at female postdocs and doctoral candidates in the transition phase and offers them structured career advice and support. The career coaching programme offers coaching and qualification opportunities to promote the careers of female postdocs with and without management responsibilities. Deadline: 30 November 2020. more…

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